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Evaluation of the Quality and Reliability of Online Video Content for Patient and Referring Clinician Education
Erick DeVinney, BS1; Elisabeth Maria Brakkee, MD, MSc2; Ivica Ducic, MD, PhD3; J Henk Coert, MD, PhD
1AxoGen, Alachua, FL; 2UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands; 3Washington Nerve Institute, McLean, VA; 4Utrecht University Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands

Background YouTube is the second most visited website on the internet and serves a content reservoir and search engine for most of the world. In our study, we aim to investigate the quality and reliability of video content for traumatic neuroma related nerve pain.
Material and methods A search was made by using keywords “Neuroma” on the YouTube search portal. The 50 most watched videos were selected for review. The video source duration of the videos, view counts, like counts, dislike counts, number of comments, the date the video was published, and the video's release time were noted. Videos were categories based on pathology and videos for traumatic neuromas were independently rated in terms of technical aspects and video quality.
Results Video uploaders consist of 50 physicians or healthcare institutions. The top 50 videos combined for over 1 million views. Morton’s Neuroma (or interdigital neuromas) represented 36 of the top videos, Acoustic Neuroma represented 12 and Traumatic Neuroma represented only 2 videos. The Traumatic Neuroma videos were ranked 44th and 48th on the list of the top 50, and combined for only 1496 views. DISCERN, JAMA and GQS scores were low and indicated overall poor quality and reliability. No correlation was observed with views, like counts or dislike counts.
Conclusion: We did not find quality and reliable information on YouTube videos about traumatic neuroma. There is a dramatic lack of quality information available on neuroma related pain and neuroma management. These information gaps may play a role in the delayed presentation of neuroma pain patients in the nerve surgeons practice and the relative misinformation in the referring clinician community with regards to the role of modern nerve surgery in the management of traumatic neuromas and neuroma related pain. Future efforts should focus on building high quality and accessible educational content targeted to patients and referring clinicians on traumatic neuromas and their surgical management.


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